Quickled Radishes, Two Ways

I’m in red radish overload this week: a huge bunch in Monday’s CSA box, plus we finally got a heat spike in Philadelphia – a string of over-80, humid days – that sent my entire patch of Cherry Belles to the verge of bolt. Rads can quickly get woody after they flower, so I yanked out most of the plants this morning.

With a biggish holiday-weekend BBQ coming up – a Boston Butt from Wyebrook Farm will end up as either al pastor or pulled pork – it seemed like the perfect time to get some quickles into jars. They add a showy-pink, sweet-sour crunch to salads, sandwiches, and tacos.

I know many people are intimidated by pickling, but this quick method couldn’t be easier – no hot-water processing required. In just about 30 minutes this morning, I extended the life of two big bunches of radishes. They’ll keep in the fridge for a week or two (though they never last that long in my house).

Radish quick pickles
Radish quickles, hot and plain.
Quick-Pickled Radishes

You can use any kind of vinegar here, and you can vary the salt, the amount and type of sweetener, and what you’re pickling. Jicama, onions, kohlrabi, and cauliflower have all worked well for me. Today, I used the same brine for both jars – just varied the veggies inside.

Hot Jar
  • one bunch red radishes, washed, trimmed, and thinly sliced
  • two or three red scallions, roughly chopped
  • one whole, dried chili pepper (I used a cayenne from last year’s garden)
  • a couple sprigs of cilantro
Plain Jar
  • one bunch red radishes, washed, trimmed, and cut into wedges
  • that’s it. really. just radishes.
Brine

This was enough for both jars.

  • 3/4 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 3/4 cup water
  • 2 t pickling salt
  • 1/4 cup honey

Combine vinegar, water, salt, and honey in a saucepan; bring to a boil. Pour hot brine into the jars. Let cool completely. Cover and refrigerate. Let them cure for a day or two before you dig in.

2 Comments Add yours

  1. Tammy says:

    Love the idea of quickled and radishes are something that we receive an over-abundance of so this would be a nice alternative to eating them raw.

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